Gouya

First opened in Terazuka in 1995, Gouya offers up Chinese noodles in an original veggie-filled Japanese soup, the stock of which is carefully crafted from dried bonito flakes, dried mackerel flakes, dried sardines, konbu (kelp) and shiitake mushrooms. The subtle flavor blends well with the stellar…

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Wagokoro Tonkatsu Anzu

Tonkatsu, or breaded fried pork chops, are often sliced and served over shredded cabbage with Worcestershire sauce or can be found on a bed of rice (katsudon), inside a sandwich or on a plate of curry. The mission of Washin Tonkatsu Anzu is to make…

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Shifuku

Located amongst the warehouses near Fukuoka Airport, this ramen shop is not easy to find but is well worth the effort. Owner Yoshinobu Sakimukai is from Kagoshima where ramen is often made with a blend of pork and chicken soup. But at Shifuku, only…

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Bunryu

If you know ramen, then you know some of the best places, like Bunryu, are found in the warehouse districts. Instead of a snazzy decor, Bunryu focuses on getting the food right: from the handmade pork broth (made from Japanese pork bones) and noodles made on the premises, to the braised pork and boiled eggs. The super thin noodles pair perfectly with…

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Aji no Masafuku

If you’re looking for a taste of local cuisine when you visit Fukuoka, look no further than Aji no Masafuku. Formerly a ramen shop, Aji no Masafuku switched to teishoku (set meals) in 1976 when it moved into the newly opened Tenjin Core. Later, it opened a second shop that it eventually moved to ACROS Fukuoka. Fresh fish is the centerpiece of…

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Kawaya

Fukuoka is the birthplace of many beloved soul foods, from ramen to motsunabe, but even die-hard locals may not realize that our yakitori is uniquely Fukuokan. What seems normal here, like…

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Udon Wasuke

Fukuoka’s claim to be the birthplace of Japanese udon noodles is subject to debate, but when it comes to goboten udon (udon noodles with burdock tempura), there’s no question: Fukuoka did it first, and still does it best. Udon Wasuke is a particularly popular place to try this local favorite…

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Yoshizuka Unagiya

In Japan, there is an age-old custom of eating eel when the heat hits. In Fukuoka, the locals know that if you want good eel, you have to go to Yoshizuka. Founded in 1873, Yoshizuka Unagiya first set up shop in Yoshizuka, but now calls a riverside venue…

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Hanayama

Among the city’s 150 year-old yatai, Hanayama is truly unique. Unlike the bustling rows of food stalls in other parts of town, Hanayama sits alone on the approach to Hakozaki Shrine in Higashi Ward. It’s also massive. While a typical yatai can hold eight to 10 people, Hanayama seats 42…

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Ganso Hakata Mentaiju

Look around Fukuoka and you’ll find loads of souvenir shops that sell mentaiko (spicy pollock roe), but there’s only one restaurant that specializes in mentaiko dishes: Ganso Hakata Mentaiju. Step into the unique wooden box-like building, then get cozy in a private room or choose a seasonally-themed table or counter seat…

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